Focus, Scope and Objectives

Medicina e Morale | Rivista internazionale di Bioetica is a scientific quarterly journal promoted by the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (UCSC). The journal publishes original articles on bioethics, moral philosophy, medical ethics, deontology, philosophy of law, and related disciplines, as well as case studies in which ethical dilemmas are relevant. Started up by Catholic Doctors of Turin, with the aim of reflecting on medico-moral issues, the Journal has published the first issue in 1951, under the direction of Fr. Agostino Gemelli (UCSC’s Rector), Peter Sisto (Professor of Special Pathology at the University of Turin) and Peter Swifts (Professor of Biological Chemistry at the University of Milan). Physicians Enzo De Lorenzi and Gian Pietro Ravera worked as Editorial Staff. From No. 1 on 1955 “Vita e Pensiero” publisher bought the Journal, but Editor-in-Chief and Editor Staff were unchanged. In 1973 the above-mentioned publisher tried to implement the Journal by a major involvement of the Faculty of Medicine. Prof. Angelo Fiori, forensic scientist, became the Editor-in-chief and the Editorial Committee and the Editorial Staff were enlarged. In 1974 Prof. Elio Sgreccia started to collaborate with the Journal, and later he became Editor, alongside Prof. Fiori. The Journal broadened its horizon, dealing with Bioethics. After some administrative difficulties in 1983, "Medicina e Morale", managed by the Faculty of Medicine at UCSC, came quickly to the milestone of over 3000 subscribers, partly from foreign countries. We can say with justifiable satisfaction, that now the Journal has a credit in Italy and in other countries around the world and it is present in several important Universities and Cultural Institutions. In 2015 Prof. Antonio G. Spagnolo, Director of the Institute of Bioethics and Medical Humanities of UCSC of Rome, has become Editor-in-Chief of the Journal.

Frequenza di pubblicazione

All papers are published quarterly, by adding them to the "current" volume's Table of Contents.

Acquisto di un articolo

I lettori non abbonati possono anche acquistare singoli articoli, alle seguenti modalità e costi.
Medicina e Morale - Acquisto di un articolo: 15,00 (EUR)
Il pagamento di questa quota ti permetterà di vedere, scaricare e stampare quest'articolo.

Indexing

Medicina e Morale is included in the “Fascia A Anvur” for the following academic sectors: 11/C1 - THEORETICAL PHILOSOPHY; 11/C2 - LOGIC, HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE; 11/C3 - MORAL PHILOSOPHY; 11/C4 - AESTHETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGES; 11/C5 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. Medicina e Morale is in the list of “ANVUR scientific journals” for two areas: 12 - LEGAL SCIENCES and 14 - POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES. Medicina e Morale is indexed by: Scopus, The Philosopher’s Index, EBSCO, Ovid, ProQuest, WorldCat, ERIH plus and Catalogo italiano dei periodici (ACNP) Medicina e Morale is included in the Collections of the National Library of Medicine, as well as in the Top 100 Bioethics Journals in the World of the Bioethics Research Library of the Georgetown University The Journal is associated with USPI (Unione Stampa Periodica italiana), and it is present in LinkedIn and Twitter

Publication Ethics

Editorship
PAGEPress strongly support the mission of the COPE Code of Conduct and Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors; all individuals collaborating with PAGEPress are strongly invited to comply with this mission.

Ethics
All research articles published by PAGEPress journals are subject to a rigorous ethical standards. Our journals endorses the Code of Conduct of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), as well as the COPE International Standards for Editors and Authors Guidelines. The Editorial Board of each journal is responsible for the form the peer review process will take; therefore, all authors in the biomedical field must adhere to the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals. PAGEPress endorses the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) Policy Statement on Geopolitical Intrusion on Editorial Decisions, too.

Plagiarism
The Editorial Board of our journals will immediately screen all articles submitted for publication in that journal. All submissions we receive are checked for plagiarism by using online available tools as iThenticate®. Any suspected misconduct ends up with a quick rejection and is then reported to the European Science Foundation and to the US Office of Research Integrity. The European Science Foundation released a Code of Conduct on Research Integrity, which is fully supported by our journals. All authors submitting papers to our journals are required to adopt these policies. Below some online resource to help you in understanding plagiarism:

Conflict of Interests
Conflict of interest exists when an author (or the author's institution), reviewer, or editor has financial or personal relationships that inappropriately influence (bias) his or her actions (such relationships are also known as dual commitments, competing interests, or competing loyalties). These relationships vary from negligible to great potential for influencing judgment. Not all relationships represent true conflict of interest. On the other hand, the potential for conflict of interest can exist regardless of whether an individual believes that the relationship affects his or her scientific judgment. Financial relationships (such as employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, and paid expert testimony) are the most easily identifiable conflicts of interest and the most likely to undermine the credibility of the journal, the authors, and of science itself. However, conflicts can occur for other reasons, such as personal relationships, academic competition, and intellectual passion. All participants in the peer-review and publication process must disclose all relationships that could be viewed as potential conflicts of interest. Disclosure of such relationships is also important in connection with editorials and review articles, because it can be more difficult to detect bias in these types of publications than in reports of original research. Editors may use information disclosed in conflict-of-interest and financial-interest statements as a basis for editorial decisions. When authors submit a manuscript, whether an article or a letter, they are responsible for disclosing all financial and personal relationships that might bias their work. To prevent ambiguity, authors must state explicitly whether potential conflicts do or do not exist. Authors should do so in the manuscript on a conflict-of-interest notification page, providing additional detail, if necessary, in a cover letter that accompanies the manuscript. Increasingly, individual studies receive funding from commercial firms, private foundations, and government. The conditions of this funding have the potential to bias and otherwise discredit the research. Scientists have an ethical obligation to submit creditable research results for publication. Moreover, as the persons directly responsible for their work, researchers should not enter into agreements that interfere with their access to the data and their ability to analyze them independently, and to prepare and publish manuscripts. Authors should describe the role of the study sponsor, if any, in study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing the report; and the decision to submit the report for publication. If the supporting source had no such involvement, the authors should so state. Biases potentially introduced when sponsors are directly involved in research are analogous to methodological biases. Editors may request that authors of a study funded by an agency with a proprietary or financial interest in the outcome sign a statement, such as "I had full access to all of the data in this study and I take complete responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis." Editors should be encouraged to review copies of the protocol and/or contracts associated with project-specific studies before accepting such studies for publication. Editors may choose not to consider an article if a sponsor has asserted control over the authors' right to publish. Reviewers must disclose to editors any conflicts of interest that could bias their opinions of the manuscript, and they should recuse themselves from reviewing specific manuscripts if the potential for bias exists. As in the case of authors, silence on the part of reviewers concerning potential conflicts may mean either that conflicts exist and the reviewer has failed to disclose them or conflicts do not exist. Reviewers must therefore also be asked to state explicitly whether conflicts do or do not exist. Reviewers must not use knowledge of the work, before its publication, to further their own interests. Editors who make final decisions about manuscripts must have no personal, professional, or financial involvement in any of the issues they might judge. Other members of the editorial staff, if they participate in editorial decisions, must provide editors with a current description of their financial interests (as they might relate to editorial judgments) and recuse themselves from any decisions in which a conflict of interest exists.

Protection of Human Subjects and Animals in Research
When reporting experiments on human subjects, authors should indicate whether the procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2013 (https://www.wma.net/policies-post/wma-declaration-of-helsinki-ethical-principles-for-medical-research-involving-human-subjects/). If doubt exists whether the research was conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration, the authors must explain the rationale for their approach and demonstrate that the institutional review body explicitly approved the doubtful aspects of the study. When reporting experiments on animals, authors should indicate whether institutional and national standards for the care and use of laboratory animals were followed. Further guidance on animal research ethics is available from the World Medical Association (2016 revision, https://www.wma.net/policies-post/wma-statement-on-animal-use-in-biomedical-research/) and from the International Association of Veterinary Editors’ Consensus Author Guidelines on Animal Ethics and Welfare (http://www.veteditors.org/consensus-author-guidelines-on-animal-ethics-and-welfare-for-editors). When reporting experiments on ecosystems involving non-native species, Authors are bound to ensure compliance with the institutional and national guide for the preservation of native biodiversity.